Vindolanda and the dating of roman footwear

Occasional travellers reached the site over the next two hundred years, and the accounts they left are useful because they predate much of the stone-stealing that has damaged the site.

The military bath-house was still partly roofed when Christopher Hunter visited the site in 1702.

more The ancient Egyptian city of Tell el-Amarna (or Amarna, ancient Akhetaten) was the short-lived capital built by the controversial Pharaoh Akhenaten, probably the father of the famous Tutankhamun, and abandoned shortly after his death (c. It is one of the few Pharaonic cities to have been thoroughly excavated and is a rich source of information about the daily life of the ancient Egyptians.

The ancient Egyptian city of Tell el-Amarna (or Amarna, ancient Akhetaten) was the short-lived capital built by the controversial Pharaoh Akhenaten, probably the father of the famous Tutankhamun, and abandoned shortly after his death (c....

Mason (eds.), Frontiers of Knowledge: A Research Framework for Hadrian’s Wall, English Heritage, Durham County Council and Durham University. “Before Hadrian’s Wall: Early military communities on the Roman frontier in Britain,” in R. “If the shoe fits: Style and function of children’s shoes from Vindolanda” in R. Mc Intosh (eds.), Life in the Limes: Studies of the People and Objects of the Roman Frontiers. AD) suggests that the prefect's family, including infants, had a public role within the fort and the military community.

more Update on the footwear discoveries at Vindolanda from the first four periods of occupation, ca. Conclusions include that there was a significant population of non-adult male individuals in the earliest period of occupation on the site.2014. This paper argues that the style of children's shoes in the period 3 praetorium at Vindolanda (late 1st-early 2nd c.

It is noted for the Vindolanda tablets, among the most important finds of military and private correspondence (written on wooden tablets) found anywhere in the Roman Empire.

Other smaller forts and matching camps would have been every days march, about 13 miles along the road.This is Vindolanda: the front line of Roman Britannia turned into the front line of historical research.Vindolanda sits just 30 miles south of the English-Scottish border in a rural setting. Symonds (eds.), Breaking Down Boundaries: Hadrian’s Wall in the 21st Century, Journal of Roman Archaeology. “If the shoe fits: Style and function of children’s shoes from Vindolanda” in R. Mc Intosh (eds.), Life in the Limes: Studies of the People and Objects of the Roman Frontiers. The book consists of two parts: the catalogue and the preliminary analysis. “Leather artefacts in the Hadrian’s Wall region,” in M. This volume, the first of two, presents the leatherwork excavated at the site by these various expeditions.